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Posts Tagged ‘email subject’

Best and Worst Email Subject Line

October 21st, 2009 by XDXY eMarketing

What’s the BEST email subject line have you ever seen which made you click it right away? And what’s the WORST?

I occasionally read a report today which analyzed the open rates for over 200 million emails, the range from open rate of 93% which is the best to a dismal 0.5%, but believe me, I see some even worse then that.

I have blogged ‘Better email subject lines‘, ‘Email Blast (eDM) subject Guideline‘, and ‘How best to display e-mail on a handheld‘ for the subject line topic before, you can try to see if it works for below email subject Line comparisons:

BEST Email Subject line with Highest Open Rate:

best_email_subject_line
WORST Email Subject line with Lowest Open Rate:

worst_email_subject_line
Frankly, I personally not quite agree some of above comments and I don’t think the highest open rate email subject line are attractive enough, at least,  not works for me.

Would you like to share what’s the BEST & WORST email subject line have you ever seen?

Email Marketing ,

8 Tips to write ‘eye-catching’ subject line

May 20th, 2009 by XDXY eMarketing

Write a attractive subject line to drive recipients to open and read your email is the 1st and most important step, which some of the companies still not master it yet. Here are some Tips regarding how to write ‘eye-catching’ subject line to improve your open-rate and generated more profit from it.

1. Personalize. Personalized subject lines always attractive than normal email subject lines. Put the first name and following a great offer always be a wise choice like: ‘Jacob, We have 50% off for you today’, or ‘Jacob, Here is your Tech solution doc’. People always sensitive about their name even more then offer.

2. Show value. Sherpa’s top subject-line performers showed that pushing the value of a particular newsletter in the first two words was optimal. I recommend having your subject line writer focus on what *exactly* those first two words should be.

3. Branding. A practice that has really taken hold in the last year or two is including the name of your company or newsletter/promotion in the subject line, usually at the beginning and enclosed in brackets. e.g. [XDXY eMarketing] 8 Tips to write ‘eye-catching’ subject line. This practice reinforces the from line, ensuring recipients that it’s coming from a trusted source.

4. Trigger words. The certain words or types of words, by themselves, trigger response as much as or more than subject-line length. Being punchy is *often* important to the art of writing subject lines, but including the right words from start to finish is more integral.

5. Keep it short. In general, shorter subject lines are associated with better email performance, as determined by opens and clicks. In its 2007 Email Benchmark Guide, MarketingSherpa concludes, “When it comes to subject lines, shorter is better. It’s as close to a universal rule of the Internet that simple messages that can be instantly digested are the best way to take advantage of our short digital attention span.”

6. Analysis and keep improving. Subject lines are the easiest component of email marketing to improve. Split your list in half, thirds or even quarters and test a different type of subject line in each split. A key is to test types of subject lines so that you can carry the learning into future distributions.

7. Don’t Get Filtered. DO NOT cross the line your subject line may trigger a spam filter. Use SPAM content checker, and sent it to your major personal email account as testing.

8. Proofread. If you are asking someone else to do work for you, take the time to make your message look professional. While your spell checker won’t catch every mistake, at the very least it will catch a few typos. If you are sending a message that will be read by someone higher up on the chain of command (a superior or professor, for instance), or if you’re about to mass-mail dozens or thousands of people, take an extra minute or two before you hit “send”. Show a draft to a close associate, in order to see whether it actually makes sense.

Email Marketing

Get your email read by your customer

April 6th, 2009 by XDXY eMarketing

When we doing email marketing, there are at 3 basic steps  for us to reach out our customers:

- get your email opened by your customer
- get your email read by your customer
- get your offer be accepted by your customer  (Click & take action)

Yes, the most important thing over the 3 points is to get your customer open your email, then they can read it and take the action then. Actually, I have blogged one regarding email subject line, today I prefer to share the tips on get your email read by your customer.

1. Drive attention.
At the beginning of the email content, you must to wake up reader’s interest. So the most important paragraph is the 1st brief one to tell the readers what they can get in this email.

2. Offer valuable information
Deliver something your customer, the readers always asking this question ‘what’s in it for me?’ if you can not answer this question, please stop sent email to this client. you don’t want either waste their time or yours, do you?

3. be straight
People are busy, most of recipients have tens of emails need to go through daily, that means they will just spend a little time on each email. be straight and point out your highlights.

4. ‘To be continue’
At the end of email, you can tell your recipients that you will send other emails days later. And give a sneak peak on the topic you are going to send, and for sure to add the benefit what your reader can get from it.

Those above maybe out-of-date tips, but please keep those in your mind before you draft your email.

Email Marketing ,

Better email subject lines

January 23rd, 2009 by admin

In general, shorter subject lines are associated with better email performance, as determined by opens and clicks.

In its 2007 Email Benchmark Guide, MarketingSherpa concludes, “When it comes to subject lines, shorter is better. It’s as close to a universal rule of the Internet that simple messages that can be instantly digested are the best way to take advantage of our short digital attention span.”

Email domains often limit the number of subject line characters displayed by default in the inbox.
AOL, which is responsible for approximately 22% of the U.S. email market, limits subject lines to roughly 38 characters.
Yahoo!, with 21% of U.S. email, has a approximate limit of 47 characters per subject line.
Hotmail, which has 14% of the U.S. email market, uses word wrap to display subject lines on multiple lines, allowing approximately 45 characters per line.

Therefore, 57% of U.S. email recipients see only the fi rst 38 to 47 characters of a subject line when making the decision to open an email. Additionally, the growing reliance on mobile devices — and their smaller screens that display even fewer characters — affects this trend as well.

Because higher open and click rates depend on the optimum combination and content, marketers should keep in mind the following rules of thumb:

1. Front load subject lines with the most important information.
2. Keep the subject line as short as possible to ensure the message can be read clearly.
3. Use longer subject lines only when there is a compelling reason to do so.
4. When in doubt, test.

Email Marketing ,

Email Blast (eDM) subject Guideline

January 5th, 2009 by admin

The ultimate goal was to identify which subject lines readers for each newsletter liked or disliked based on those rates. Here are the four biggest takeaways:

Takeaway #1. Show value in the first two words

Sherpa’s top subject-line performers showed that pushing the value of a particular newsletter in the first two words was optimal. Meinhart recommends having your subject line writer focus on what *exactly* those first two words should be.

To illustrate the importance of those initial words, here are the 10 top-performing subject lines in the 12-month time period:

- Top 12 Email Newsletter Mistakes
- Simple Email Link Change Lifts Clicks
- CAN-SPAM – Must-Know Updates
- Best Time to Send Email: Test Results
- 6 Actions to Lift Clickthroughs: New Data
- Your Copy of Annual Email Study Results Enclosed
- HTML vs Text: Which Works Better?
- Newsletter Design Exclusive Data
- Email Audit PDF: How-to & Checklist
- How to Conduct Email Surveys

Meinhart says the first two words of these top performers convey the intended benefit for newsletter subscribers. “Top 12,” “Simple Email,” “6 Actions” and “Your Copy” were all examples of informing the readers they are *getting an actionable item*.

CAN-SPAM was a hot-button issue at the time of that particular newsletter edition, representing a different, newsy value. But it was still communicated at the very start of the subject line.

Here are EmailSherpa’s Bottom 10 subject lines:

o Target Referrals & Abandons
o Eastern Europe Factbook
o Tailor Lists to Reach Exec Moms
o Call for Speakers – Email Summit & Expo ’09
o Your Input, Please: Annual Marketing Questionnaire
o How Wholesaler Lifted Orders 13%
o Buyer’s Guide to Top Survey Vendors
o Turn Customer Queries Into Profit
o Test Your Email Practices; Friday Award Deadline
o Alert: Analysis of New CAN-SPAM Rules

Meinhart believes the rates on those subject lines dipped partly due to a lack of communicated value in the first two words. The subject matter may have contributed to their low open rates and CTRs as well, but the word choices and sequences really weren’t optimal.

For instance, notice how “Alert: Analysis of New CAN-SPAM Rules” did poorly. But “CAN-SPAM – Must-Know Updates” did well. The latter subject line clearly represented an immediate value over the former.

email-subject-not-spam

Takeaway #2. Find the right ‘trigger words’

Meinhart found that certain words or types of words, by themselves, trigger response as much as or more than subject-line length. Being punchy is *often* important to the art of writing subject lines, but including the right words from start to finish is more integral.

“A trigger can be a name, the use of numbers, the number of characters in the subject line, the use of an industry phrase, or the appearance of an unusual word,” Meinhart explains. “Subject lines also need to stay within brand guidelines. It’s easy to get a high open rate by using sensationalistic language. But if you are not careful, you can harm your brand in the process.”

What about subject-line length? The top four EmailSherpa performers (see Takeaway #1) were between 31 and 41 characters (including spaces); pretty short.

But not conclusive that short is always better; every marketer should test subject line length for themselves. For instance, from the data, Meinhart says that content-driven newsletters can successfully use longer subject lines when there is a real primer, such as a PDF download, a white paper or other easily accessible information.

For all lengths, she suggests, dedicate at least a few hours to the subject line. Whittle away at the line until it’s powerful.

Takeaway #3. Watch the hard sell

Recent MarketingSherpa Case Studies also indicate that eretailers that minimized hard-sell language got better results. Meinhart says newsletters are similar. Sherpa results suffered when the subject line seemed too self-promotional – we told folks to do something or it came across as a hard sell.

Here are the 10 worst performers in the last year for Sherpa’s B2B subject lines:

- Please Take Quick Tech Survey Today
- Call for Speakers: Demand Gen Summit
- You’re Invited – Biz Tech Webinar June 17
- Early Bird Special for Demand Gen Summit
- Nominations to Speak at Email Summit
- Podcast: Contests for Lead Gen
- Podcast: Get Wicked Good Leads
- Game Lifts Sales – Test & Results
- How to Weed Out Consumer Leads From B-to-B Campaign
- Touched by Angels

Instead of offering immediate value, the subject line asked subscribers to do something, and the opens and CTRs dipped. Of course, we already knew that Sherpa readers dislike corporate gobbledygook and empty content.

As a result, Sherpa’s subject line writers are seeking to provide subscribers with more value, while still promoting surveys and events in newsletters (but not in subject lines).

“We’ve developed a new set of subject-line guidelines, with a goal of trying to hit or surpass our average response rates. Some newsletters are already showing improvement. The times when we’ve knowingly violated the guidelines, our subscribers let us know with a much lower than average CTR.”

Takeaway #4. Hot brands work across sectors

Putting hot brand names into the subject line isn’t just for eretailers. The top ContentBiz newsletter performer, for instance, was “Facebook App Tips”.

Here are three other top-performing subject lines for Great Minds:

o Google AdWords: 8 Tips to Lift ROI
o Get Listed on Wikipedia – 3 Ways + Monitoring Tips
o Use Facebook to Market Yourself & Your Company

NOTE: We may have done even better by putting “Wikipedia” and “Facebook” as the first word in the latter two subject lines. Getting a hot brand into that crucial two-word window can turn a good email performance into a better one.

Email Marketing ,